Monday, August 24

Viceroy Butterfly

Viceroy Butterfly
South Milwaukee Wisconsin

The viceroy (Limenitis archippus) is a North American butterfly that ranges through most of the contiguous United States as well as parts of Canada and Mexico. The westernmost portion of its range extends from the Northwest Territories along the eastern edges of the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada mountains, southwards into central Mexico. Its easternmost range extends along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of North America from Nova Scotia into Texas.

The viceroy was named the state butterfly of Kentucky in 1990
Its wings feature an orange and black pattern, and over most of its range it is a Müllerian mimic with the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). The viceroy's wingspan is between 53 and 81 mm. It can be distinguished from the monarch by its smaller size and the postmedian black line that runs across the veins on the hindwing.
-wiki

You think you're looking at a Monarch? Think again:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/monarch/Viceroy1.html

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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Sunday, August 23

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

South Milwaukee

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

The Eastern tiger swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) is a species of swallowtail butterfly native to eastern North America. It is one of the most familiar butterflies in the eastern United States, where it is common in many different habitats. It flies from spring to fall, during which it produces two to three broods. Adults feed on the nectar of many species of flowers, mostly from those of the Apocynaceae, Asteraceae, and Fabaceae families. P. glaucus has a wingspan measuring 7.9 to 14 cm (3.1 to 5.5 in). The male is yellow with four black "tiger stripes" on each fore wing. Females may be either yellow or black, making them dimorphic. The yellow morph is similar to the male, but with a conspicuous band of blue spots along the hindwing, while the dark morph is almost completely black.

The green eggs are laid singly on plants of the Magnoliaceae and Rosaceae families. Young caterpillars are brown and white; older ones are green with two black, yellow, and blue eyespots on the thorax. The caterpillar will turn brown prior to pupating. It will reach a length of 5.5 centimetres (2.2 in). The chrysalis varies from a whitish color to dark brown. Hibernation occurs in this stage in locations with cold winter months.
-wiki



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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Saturday, August 22

The Eastern Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

The Eastern Black Swallowtail.
South Milwaukee

(Papilio polyxenes), also called the American Swallowtail or Parsnip Swallowtail, is a butterfly found throughout much of North America. It is the state butterfly of Oklahoma. An extremely similar-appearing species, Papilio joanae, occurs in the Ozark Mountains region, but it appears to be closely related to Papilio machaon, rather than P. polyxenes. The species is named after the figure in Greek mythology, Polyxena (pron.: /pəˈlɪksɨnə/; Greek: Πολυξένη), who was the youngest daughter of King Priam of Troy.

The Papilio polyxenes demonstrates polyandry and a lek mating system, showing no male parental care and display sites. Females are therefore able to choose males based on these sites and males are the only resource the females find at these sites.
-wiki






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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Thursday, August 20

Eastern Kingbird

Kenosha Wisconsin

The eastern kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) is a large tyrant flycatcher native to North America.
Adults are grey-black on the upperparts with light underparts; they have a long black tail with a white end and long pointed wings. They have a red patch on their crown, seldom seen. They are of average size for a kingbird, at 19–23 cm (7.5–9.1 in), 33–38 cm (13–15 in) across the wings and weighing 33–55 g (1.2–1.9 oz).[2]
The call is a high-pitched, buzzing and unmusical chirp, frequently compared to an electric fence.

Their breeding habitat is open areas across North America. They make a sturdy cup nest in a tree or shrub, sometimes on top of a stump or pole. These birds aggressively defend their territory, even against much larger birds.[4]

These birds migrate in flocks to South America. There is one European record, from Ireland in October 2012.
They wait on an open perch and fly out to catch insects in flight, sometimes hovering to pick food off vegetation. They also eat berries and fruit, mainly in their wintering areas.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Harest Time on the Farm

Harvest Time on the Farm
Wisconsin

(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Fallin'

Fallin'
Wisconsin

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http://fineartamerica.com/featured/fallin-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true 
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Thursday, August 13

Day 2 of the Perseid Meteor Shower

Perseid Meteor Shower

Aug. 13th 2015. 23:30
Canon 5Dmk III with a 17-24mm L, 30th/s, ISO 800 wide open at F/2.8

The Perseids /ˈpɜrsiːɨdz/ are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift–Tuttle. The Perseids are so called because the point from which they appear to come, called the radiant, lies in the constellation Perseus. The name derives in part from the word Perseides (Περσείδες), a term found in Greek mythology referring to the sons of Perseus.
The stream of debris is called the Perseid cloud and stretches along the orbit of the comet Swift–Tuttle. The cloud consists of particles ejected by the comet as it travels on its 133-year orbit. Most of the particles have been part of the cloud for around a thousand years. However, there is also a relatively young filament of dust in the stream that was pulled off the comet in 1865, which can give an early mini-peak the day before the maximum shower. The dimensions of the cloud in the vicinity of the Earth are estimated to be approximately 0.1 astronomical units (AU) across and 0.8 AU along the latter’s orbit, spread out by annual interactions with the Earth’s gravity.
The shower is visible from mid-July each year, with the peak in activity between 9 and 14 August, depending on the particular location of the stream. During the peak, the rate of meteors reaches 60 or more per hour.
-wiki

Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/1-perseid-meteor-shower-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.

Perseids Meteor Shower

*Perseid Meteor Shower
#Wisconsin   Aug. 13th 2015.
(After cleaning up and dehazing through Photoshop)
Canon 5Dmk III with a 17-24mm L,  30th/s, ISO 800 wide open at F/2.8

The Perseids /ˈpɜrsiːɨdz/ are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift–Tuttle. The Perseids are so called because the point from which they appear to come, called the radiant, lies in the constellation Perseus. The name derives in part from the word Perseides (Περσείδες), a term found in Greek mythology referring to the sons of Perseus.
The stream of debris is called the Perseid cloud and stretches along the orbit of the comet Swift–Tuttle. The cloud consists of particles ejected by the comet as it travels on its 133-year orbit. Most of the particles have been part of the cloud for around a thousand years. However, there is also a relatively young filament of dust in the stream that was pulled off the comet in 1865, which can give an early mini-peak the day before the maximum shower. The dimensions of the cloud in the vicinity of the Earth are estimated to be approximately 0.1 astronomical units (AU) across and 0.8 AU along the latter’s orbit, spread out by annual interactions with the Earth’s gravity.
The shower is visible from mid-July each year, with the peak in activity between 9 and 14 August, depending on the particular location of the stream. During the peak, the rate of meteors reaches 60 or more per hour.
-wiki
 
(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.
Best shot of the night, meteor straight through the heart of constellation Cassiopeia. As you see, the clouds started to take over the night.

Wednesday, August 12

Great Blue Heron

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 Prints for sale at:
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Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/4-great-blue-heron-ricky-l-jones.html

Kenosha Wisconsin
The great blue heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird in the heron family Ardeidae, common near the shores of open water and in wetlands over most of North America and Central America, as well as the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is a rare vagrant to Europe, with records from Spain, the Azores, England, and the Netherlands. An all-white population found only in the Caribbean and southern Florida was once treated as a separate species and known as the great white heron.
The great blue heron is replaced in the Old World by the very similar grey heron (Ardea cinerea), which differs in being somewhat smaller (90–98 cm (35–39 in)), with a pale gray neck and legs, lacking the browner colors that great blue heron has there. It forms a superspecies with this and also with the cocoi heron from South America, which differs in having more extensive black on the head, and a white breast and neck.
-wiki

(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2015 All rights reserved.