Wednesday, July 1

Old Sturtevant Hiawatha Depot

Old Sturtevant Hiawatha Depot

This older station had been built in 1901 by the Milwaukee Road. Sturtevant’s passenger service was discontinued by the mid 1960s but restored with the start-up of Amtrak in 1971, so that there would still be train service near Racine, which had lost its service. Although rail service had returned to Sturtevant, the building deteriorated over time and in 1998, village officials applied for a federal grant to construct a new station, while moving to prevent demolition of the old one. Financing, originally thought to be $1 million, would be funded at 80 percent by a state grant and 20 percent by the village. By July, 2000, the first architectural plans were made illustrating a 1,500 square-foot station, two side platforms and a pedestrian tunnel underneath the rails.
-greatamericanstations.com



More information about the depot please visit here:
http://www.trainweb.org/kenrail/STVT_train_legacy.html


Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/old-sturtevant-hiawatha-depot-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Lonely Tree In Monochrome

Racine Wisconsin

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Tuesday, June 30

Groundhog (Marmota monax)

Kenosha Wisconsin

Groundhog (Marmota monax)

Question: How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
Answer: A woodchuck would chuck as much wood as a woodchuck could chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood.

The groundhog (Marmota monax), also known as the woodchuck, land beaver, or the whistlepig, is a rodent of the family Sciuridae, belonging to the group of large ground squirrels known as marmots. Most marmots live in rocky and mountainous areas, but the woodchuck is a lowland creature. It is widely distributed in North America; for example, it is found in Alaska, Alabama, and Georgia. In the west it is found only in Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia and northern Washington.

#Canon #TeamCanon #Woodchuck #Groundhog #Animals #animalphotography #wildlife #wildlifephotography #nature #naturephotography #Wisconsin #marmots
(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Red-Headed Woodpecker

Petrifying Springs, Kenosha Wisconsin

The red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) is a small or medium-sized woodpecker from temperate North America. Their breeding habitat is open country across southern Canada and the eastern-central United States.

Adults are strikingly tri-colored, with a black back and tail and a red head and neck. Their underparts are mainly white. The wings are black with white secondary remiges. Adult males and females are identical in plumage. Juveniles have very similar markings, but have an all grey head. Non-birders may often mistakenly identify red-bellied woodpeckers as red-headeds, whose range overlaps somewhat with that of the red-headed woodpecker. While red-bellied woodpeckers have some bright red on the backs of their necks and heads, red-headed woodpeckers have a much deeper red that covers their entire heads and necks, as well as a dramatically different overall plumage pattern.
-wiki

Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/3-red-headed-woodpecker-ricky-l-jones.html

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Monday, June 29

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Caledonia Wisconsin

The house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is found in North America, where its range has increased since the mid-twentieth century, and in the islands of Hawaii. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are placed in the genus Haemorhous by the American Ornithologists' Union but have usually been included in Carpodacus.

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Oops A Daisy - House Finch

Caledonia Wisconsin on his Perky Pet Feeder www.birdfeeders.com

The house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is found in North America, where its range has increased since the mid-twentieth century, and in the islands of Hawaii. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are placed in the genus Haemorhous by the American Ornithologists' Union but have usually been included in Carpodacus.
(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Thursday, June 11

The Handsome Killdeer

Killdeer
Bong Recreational Area, Kenosha Wisconsin
The killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) is a medium-sized plover.
The adults have a brown back and wings, a white belly, and a white breast with two black bands. The rump is tawny orange. The face and cap are brown with a white forehead. The eyering is orange-red. The chicks are patterned almost identically to the adults, and are precocial — able to move around immediately after hatching. The killdeer frequently uses a "broken wing act" to distract predators from the nest. It is named onomatopoeically after its call.-wiki

Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-handsome-killdeer-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Wednesday, June 10

The Great White Egret


The Great White Egret
Bong Recreational Area, Kenosha Wisconsin

The great egret (Ardea alba), also known as the common egret, large egret or (in the Old World) great white heron, is a large, widely distributed egret. Distributed across most of the tropical and warmer temperate regions of the world, in southern Europe it is rather localized. In North America it is more widely distributed, and it is ubiquitous across the Sun Belt of the United States and in the Neotropics. The Old World population is often referred to as the great white egret. This species is sometimes confused with the great white heron of the Caribbean, which is a white morph of the closely related great blue heron (A. herodias).
The great egret is a large heron with all-white plumage. Standing up to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall, this species can measure 80 to 104 cm (31 to 41 in) in length and have a wingspan of 131 to 170 cm (52 to 67 in). Body mass can range from 700 to 1,500 g (1.5 to 3.3 lb), with an average of around 1,000 g (2.2 lb).
Wiki

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

The Amazing Sandhill Crane!

Horicon Marsh Wildlife Refuge,
Horicon Wisconsin

The Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) is a species of large crane of North America and extreme northeastern Siberia. The common name of this bird refers to habitat like that at the Platte River, on the edge of Nebraska's Sandhills on the American Plains. This is the most important stopover area for the nominotypical subspecies, the lesser sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis), with up to 450,000 of these birds migrating through annually.
Adults are gray overall; during breeding, their plumage is usually much worn and stained, particularly in the migratory populations, and looks nearly ochre. The average weight of the larger males is 4.57 kg (10.1 lb), while the average weight of females is 4.02 kg (8.9 lb), with a range of 2.7 to 6.7 kg (6.0 to 14.8 lb) across the subspecies.

These cranes frequently give a loud trumpeting call that suggests a French-style "r" rolled in the throat, and they can be heard from a long distance. Mated pairs of cranes engage in "unison calling." The cranes stand close together, calling in a synchronized and complex duet. The female makes two calls for every one from the male.
-wiki

Prints for sale at:
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-amazing-sandhill-crane-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Tuesday, June 2

Red-Headed Woodpecker

Petrifying Springs, Kenosha Wisconsin

The red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) is a small or medium-sized woodpecker from temperate North America. Their breeding habitat is open country across southern Canada and the eastern-central United States.

Adults are strikingly tri-colored, with a black back and tail and a red head and neck. Their underparts are mainly white. The wings are black with white secondary remiges. Adult males and females are identical in plumage. Juveniles have very similar markings, but have an all grey head. Non-birders may often mistakenly identify red-bellied woodpeckers as red-headeds, whose range overlaps somewhat with that of the red-headed woodpecker. While red-bellied woodpeckers have some bright red on the backs of their necks and heads, red-headed woodpeckers have a much deeper red that covers their entire heads and necks, as well as a dramatically different overall plumage pattern.
-wiki

Prints for sale at: http://fineartamerica.com/featured/2-red-headed-woodpecker-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved