Thursday, May 28

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal
Kenosha Wisconsin

The northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as the redbird or common cardinal. It can be found in southern Canada, through the eastern United States from Maine to Texas and south through Mexico. It is found in woodlands, gardens, shrublands, and swamps.
The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). It has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull red-brown shade. The northern cardinal is mainly granivorous, but also feeds on insects and fruit. The male behaves territorially, marking out his territory with song. During courtship, the male feeds seed to the female beak-to-beak. A clutch of three to four eggs is laid, and two to four clutches are produced each year. It was once prized as a pet, but its sale as a cage bird is now banned in the United States by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.
-wiki

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Wednesday, May 27

Indigo Bunting

Petrifying Woods, Kenosha Wisconsin

The indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea) is a small seed-eating bird in the family Cardinalidae. It is migratory, ranging from southern Canada to northern Florida during the breeding season, and from southern Florida to northern South America during the winter. It often migrates by night, using the stars to navigate. Its habitat is farmland, brush areas, and open woodland. The indigo bunting is closely related to the lazuli bunting and interbreeds with the species where their ranges overlap.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Tuesday, May 26

Palm Warbler after a Quick Bath

Milwaukee Wisconsin

The palm warbler (Setophaga palmarum) is a small songbird of the New World warbler family.
The species comprises two distinct subspecies that may merit specific status.
"Yellow palm warbler" or "eastern palm warbler" (S. p. hypochrysea) of the eastern third of the breeding range has brownish-olive upper parts and thoroughly yellow underparts with bold rufous breast and flank streaking. It migrates later in the fall than its western counterpart.
"Brown palm warbler" or "western palm warbler" (S. p. palmarum) inhabits the remaining western two-thirds of the breeding range. It has much less yellow below, with less colorful streaking, and cold grayish-brown upper parts.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Sunday, May 17

Gray Catbird

Horicon Marsh, Wisconsin

The gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), also spelled grey catbird, is a medium-sized northern American perching bird of the mimid family. It is the only member of the "catbird" genus Dumetella. Like the black catbird (Melanoptila glabrirostris), it is among the basal lineages of the Mimidae, probably a closer relative of the Caribbean thrasher and trembler assemblage than of the mockingbirds and Toxostoma thrashers. In some areas it is known as the slate-colored mockingbird.

(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2014 All rights reserved.

Friday, May 15

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher

Bong Recreational Area, Kenosha Wisconsin

The blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) is a very small songbird, 10–13 cm (3.9–5.1 in) in length and weighing only 5–7 g (0.18–0.25 oz). Adult males are blue-grey on the upperparts with white underparts, have a slender dark bill, and a long black tail edged in white. Females are less blue. Both sexes have a white eye ring.

The blue-gray gnatcatcher's breeding habitat includes open deciduous woods and shrublands in southern Ontario, the eastern and southwestern United States, and Mexico. Though gnatcatcher species are common and increasing in number while expanding to the northeast, it is the only one to breed in Eastern North America. They build a cup nest similar to a hummingbird's on a horizontal tree branch. The incubation period is 13 days for both sexes. Both parents construct the nest and feed the young; they may raise two broods in a season.   
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L.Jones Photography 1995-2014 All rights reserved.

Black-necked Stilt

Horicon Marsh, Wisconsin

The black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) is a locally abundant shorebird of American wetlands and coastlines. It is found from the coastal areas of California through much of the interior western United States and along the Gulf of Mexico as far east as Florida, then south through Central America and the Caribbean to northwest Brazil southwest Peru, east Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands. The northernmost populations, particularly those from inland, are migratory, wintering from the extreme south of the United States to southern Mexico, rarely as far south as Costa Rica; on the Baja California peninsula it is only found regularly in winter.
-wiki

(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Thursday, May 14

Greater White-fronted Goose

 Horicon Marsh Wisconsin
The greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) is a species of goose. The greater white-fronted goose is closely related to the smaller lesser white-fronted goose (A. erythropus). In Europe it has been known as simply "white-fronted goose"; in North America it is known as the greater white-fronted goose (or "greater whitefront"), and this name is also increasingly adopted internationally. It is named for the patch of white feathers bordering the base of its bill. But even more distinctive are the salt-and-pepper markings on the breast of adult birds, which is why the goose is colloquially called the "specklebelly" in North America.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

American Yellow Warbler

Horicon Marsh, Wisconsin

The American yellow warbler (Setophaga petechia, formerly Dendroica petechia) is a New World warbler species. Sensu lato, they make up the most widespread species in the diverse Setophaga genus, breeding in almost the whole of North America and down to northern South America.
Other than in male breeding plumage and body size, all subspecies are very similar. Winter, female and immature birds all have similarly greenish-yellow uppersides and are a duller yellow below. Young males soon acquire breast and, where appropriate, head coloration. Females are somewhat duller, most notably on the head. In all, the remiges and rectrices are blackish olive with yellow edges, sometimes appearing as an indistinct wing-band on the former. The eyes and the short thin beak are dark, while the feet are lighter or darker olive-buff.
-Wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

Monday, May 11

Palm Warbler

Sheridan Park, Milwaukee Wisconsin

The palm warbler (Setophaga palmarum) is a small songbird of the New World warbler family.
The species comprises two distinct subspecies that may merit specific status.
"Yellow palm warbler" or "eastern palm warbler" (S. p. hypochrysea) of the eastern third of the breeding range has brownish-olive upper parts and thoroughly yellow underparts with bold rufous breast and flank streaking. It migrates later in the fall than its western counterpart.
"Brown palm warbler" or "western palm warbler" (S. p. palmarum) inhabits the remaining western two-thirds of the breeding range. It has much less yellow below, with less colorful streaking, and cold grayish-brown upper parts.
-wiki

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http://fineartamerica.com/featured/1-palm-warbler-ricky-l-jones.html?newartwork=true
(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved

House Finch

Caledonia Wisconsin

The house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is found in North America, where its range has increased since the mid-twentieth century, and in the islands of Hawaii. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are placed in the genus Haemorhous by the American Ornithologists' Union but have usually been included in Carpodacus.
These birds are mainly permanent residents throughout their range; some northern and eastern birds migrate south. Their breeding habitat is urban and suburban areas in eastern North America as well as various semi-open areas in the west from southern Canada to northern Florida and the Mexican state of Oaxaca; the population in central Chiapas may be descended from escaped cagebirds.
-wiki

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(C) Copyright Ricky L. Jones 1995-2015 All Rights reserved